Friday, 24 March 2017

Preview - 42 reasons to see 42nd Street

"Where the underworld can meet the elite...
Naughty
Bawdy
Gaudy
Sporty
Forty-Second Street!"

I was lucky enough to be invited to the first preview of 42nd Street at the Theatre Royal Drury Lane and whilst any official opinions about the show are under embargo until press night, I thought I'd give you all some hints and teasers and a little sneak preview (assisted by these beautiful photographs courtesy of Brinkhoff & Moegenburg) through these 42 reasons to see 42nd Street. 


Thursday, 23 March 2017

Notes on a second viewing of Roman Tragedies


"I arm myself with patience and await the higher powers"


Whilst sitting in the audience for Roman Tragedies on Friday night and before it had even finished, I took advantage of the free wifi and booked myself into Sunday's show, knowing I couldn't pass up the opportunity to see this most extraordinary of shows again. And instead of writing another review in which I'd just end up repeating myself, I thought I'd just jot down some of the thoughts that came to me both whilst rewatching and on reflection afterwards.
  • More shows should take the opportunity to provide in-show footnotes
  • Likewise, the dry voiceover dispensing witty advice in the interval pauses (don't walk into the glass panels...) - I'd love to have something similar subtly ripping the piss out of Old Vic audiences
  • I also loved that it was Hans Kesting on mike duty here for the first couple of hours, it really reminds you how much of an ensemble Toneelgroep Amsterdam are, everyone pitching in at all levels
  • Similarly, Chris Nietvelt building up to her devastating Cleopatra with earlier parts as a wry newsreader and a galloping Caska
  • It's interesting to note that both times the Guardian has reviewed RT at the Barbican, it has been Lyn Gardner on duty - what does Billington have against it?!
  • Second time around, I was much more up for taking photos and tweeting during the show; on Friday I was more concerned with making sure I didn't miss anything and getting the full range of onstage seating experiences by moving at every break. By contrast on Sunday, I only went onstage for Julius Caesar and watched the rest from my seat in the auditorium - it was nice to have the choice of so much variety
  • Volumnia really is a kick-ass role isn't it
  • Is one of the memes of the year going to be productions openly acknowledging how baffling Shakespearean dialogue can be - Twelfth Night did it with boxtrees, AMND did it with extempore, and here it was being likened to an osprey, I do enjoy this lack of reverence
  • Undoubtedly there is a conversation to be had about diversity and TGA - (the ensemble has predominantly been all-white I think) - but such dialogue must be accompanied by an understanding of the racial dynamics in the Netherlands and also the realities of signing actors up to year-long ensemble contracts. And lest we forget, van Hove has regularly cast actors of colour in his other productions - Sophie Okonedo as Elizabeth Proctor, Obi Abili in Antigone, Chuk Iwuji's Lovborg, Iwuji and Aysha Kala in the forthcoming Obsession...
  • A big shoutout has to go to videographer Tal Yarden whose efforts I gained a real appreciation for this time, in realising just how nuanced and intricate his design work is. Far from simply putting up a live relay (although that is done late on in a hilarious out-of-doors sequence with Enobarbus), Yarden creates tableaux which are just as concerned with toying with our perceptions of space as van Hove's concepts and Versweyveld's sets are. Scenes like the triumvirate in conference (pictured below), Coriolanus meeting Aufidius, Mark Antony wheedling his way back into Cleopatra's good books are given an alternative reality on screen as shots are spliced together to create a public image with a message versus the distance that is often there in reality - constantly thought-provoking work.


So there we have it, one of the greatest theatrical experiences I've ever had the pleasure to witness and one which has stood the test of time in the 8 years since I originally saw it. I hope it isn't 8 more years until I see it again!


Deaths















Tuesday, 21 March 2017

Review: An American in Paris, Dominion

"Who could ask for anything more"

True to its name, An American in Paris premiered in 2014 at the Théâtre du Châtelet in the French capital to ecstatic reviews before transferring to the Palace Theatre on Broadway for another well-received (and Tony-winning) run there. It now rocks up at the newly refurbished Dominion Theatre, just ahead of another huge dance-heavy Broadway musical in 42nd Street, producers clearly banking on audiences wanting distraction from the realities of the outside world.

And that it certainly provides - director and choreographer Christopher Wheeldon's reinvention of the 1951 film (new book by Craig Lucas) is an absolute feast for the eyes and ears. George and Ira Gershwin's score is beyond classic ('I Got Rhythm', ''S Wonderful', 'They Can't Take That Away from Me' et al) and sounds luscious in Rob Fisher's new arrangements musically directed by John Rigby, and Bob Crowley's set and costumes look divine in all their old-school charm.

Tuesday morning treat - Sunday in the Park with George


"I give what I give"

A little something to perk us all up on a Tuesday morning. Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine’s Pulitzer Prize-winning Sunday in the Park with George is enjoying a Broadway revival at the Hudson Theatre (139-141 West 44th Street) and here's a few photographs of the show and its stars Academy Award nominee Jake Gyllenhaal (in his Broadway musical debut) and Tony Award winner Annaleigh Ashford doing things in and around the show. 

Directed by Sarna Lapine, Sondheim and Lapine’s masterpiece follows painter Georges Seurat (Gyllenhaal) in the months leading up to the completion of his most famous painting, A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte. Consumed by his need to “finish the hat,” Seurat alienates the French bourgeoisie, spurns his fellow artists, and neglects his lover Dot (Ashford), not realizing that his actions will reverberate over the next 100 years. And if you're over the pond, Sunday In The Park With George runs through April 23, 2017. And as if that wasn't enough, there's also a video of Jakey singing 'Finishing the Hat' below the cut!

Monday, 20 March 2017

Review: Love in Idleness, Menier Chocolate Factory

"There’s no situation in the world that can’t be passed off with small-talk"

Overlord of all that is authentic in British theatre, Trevor Nunn is now further redefining authenticity by presenting us with a Terence Rattigan premiere, cobbled together from two pre-existing versions of the same play. Love in Idleness was originally known as Less Than Kind (which itself was seen at the Jermyn Street back in 2011) but was rewritten at the behest of its stars, a commercially minded decision which proved fatal to Rattigan's reputation. And rather than choose one or the other, Nunn has fashioned something new (but assumably still authentic), named for the later version.

Sadly, that sense of compromise lingers strongly here. Fans of Rattigan were utterly spoiled by pitch-perfect interpretations of After the Dance and Flare Path (also by Nunn) at the beginning of this decade and again last year with an excoriating The Deep Blue Sea, so knowing the emotional force with which he can devastate us can only leave you disappointed at the tonally strange and inconsequential comedy of sorts with which we're presented here. Only the long-awaited return of the marvellous Eve Best to the London stage imbues the evening with the quality it scarcely deserves.

Saturday, 18 March 2017

Review: La Cage aux Folles, New Wimbledon

"It's rather gaudy but it's also rather grand"

It doesn't feel like that long since La Cage aux Folles was strutting its stuff in London as I made several visits to the Playhouse as it rotated its main cast on a regular basis (Douglas Hodge and Denis Lawson, Philip Quast and Roger Allam, John Barrowman and Simon Burke) but it has a good few years. So the time is clearly ripe for a revival and Kenwright and co clearly agree as they've mounted the show's first ever UK tour.

And with John Partridge and Adrian Zmed at the helm, it remains as gloriously entertaining and heart-warmingly lovable as ever. A story about love and acceptance always has things to teach us, gay or straight, now more than ever and the story of St Tropez nightclub owners Georges and Albin is a touching one as through dealing with Georges' son's fiancée's parents' homophobia, they learn more about themselves and their own identities.

Rehearsal images for Edward Albee's The Goat, Or Who Is Sylvia

Rehearsal images for Edward Albee’s The Goat, or Who Is Sylvia? have been released , ahead of the production’s first preview next week. Albee’s darkly comic play about a family in crisis will run for a strictly limited 12 week season at the Theatre Royal Haymarket from 24 March to 24 June 2017.


In Ian Rickson’s production, a husband and successful New York architect with everything to lose must confess to his wife and son that he is having an affair and face the dizzying, explosive consequences. Damian Lewis and Sophie Okonedo play husband and wife Martin and Stevie, joined by Jason Hughes as Martin’s oldest friend Ross and newcomer Archie Madekwe as their son Billy.

The Olivier and Tony Award-winning creative team includes Rae Smith (set and costume design), Neil Austin (lighting design) and Greg Clarke (sound design), with original music by PJ Harvey. All photos courtesy of Johan Persson.


Review: Roman Tragedies, Toneelgroep Amsterdam at the Barbican

"A people who can neither rule nor be ruled"


8 years ago, I'd barely started to blog, I didn't know who Ivo van Hove was, Andrew Haydon didn't know who I was, it was an altogether simpler time. And I'd be hard pressed to tell you exactly what it was that made me click on the Barbican's website to book for a 6 hour long Shakespearean epic in Dutch but I'm glad I did, for it genuinely changed the world for me (in terms of my theatrical life anyway, who knew I'd start going to Amsterdam regularly for theatre!). I ranked the show as the best of the year for me back then in 2009 and I have to say I still think it is the greatest piece of theatre I've ever seen.

So going back for seconds was always going to be a risk but it was also something I knew I'd never be able to resist. Not least because in the intervening period, van Hove has become one of the most famous, and arguably influential, directors around. His take on A View From The Bridge was the breakthrough moment but for me, it has been his work with Toneelgroep Amsterdam that has consistently been the most revelatory - Kings of War and Scenes from a Marriage both at the Barbican, Long Day's Journey into Night and the breathtaking Maria Stuart at the gorgeous Stadsschouwburg.

Cast of Roman Tragedies continued

Friday, 17 March 2017

The 2017 Manchester Theatre Awards winners in full

"It's grim up north"

The Manchester Theatre Awards represent the cream of theatre in my native North-West, too much of which I miss due to cheap train fares being like gold dust. I'm hoping to do better this year and in the meantime, here's the full list of winners for the 2017 Awards.

Best Actor
Rob Edwards, To Kill A Mockingbird, Octagon Theatre, Bolton
David Neilson, Endgame, HOME, Manchester
Daniel Rigby, Breaking The Code, Royal Exchange, Manchester WINNER
Don Warrington, King Lear, Royal Exchange
Best Actress
Niamh Cusack, Ghosts, HOME
Kaisa Hammarlund, Sweet Charity, Royal Exchange
Julie Hesmondhalgh, Wit, Royal Exchange WINNER
Kathryn Hunter, The Emperor, HOME

Best Production
Breaking The Code, Royal Exchange WINNER
Ghosts, HOME
The Emperor, HOME
Wit, Royal Exchange

Review: Notflix, King's Head

"Because everything's better as a musical"

Between Austentatious and The Showstoppers, I've been thoroughly entertained (and consistently left in awe) by my dips into the world of improv so there's always been a slight sense of trepidation about going further afield to see others do it, just in case they're not as good! But the company to get me over myself were Waiting for the Call, the "original all-female long-form musical improv team", and their promise of a unique blend of comedy, improv and musical group work.

Their show Notflix just played at the VAULT Festival and is following that up with a week at the King's Head, ahead of a return to Edinburgh in the summer. And you can see why, as improv does carry with it a certain appeal to the festival market in its rapid-fire wit and scrappy energy and in that, WftC are certainly pitching themselves to the right places. 

Not-really-a-review: Joseph Morpurgo - Work-in-Progress, Angel Comedy Club

 funny fail kid like a boss little girl GIF





I wasn't sure what to write up about this show, a Work-in-Progress from Austentatious alum Joseph Morpurgo, at The Bill Murray pub, but it made me feel as happy as the joyous soul of the girl in the above gif, so I had to register it somehow. This was, without doubt, one of the funniest things I've seen for a very long time and if it is still only 'in-progress', I can't imagine how good it'll be once it is finished (and assumedly playing Edinburgh).  So without spoilers, it is form-shattering, artfully intelligent, and above all deeply deeply hilarious, and contains all manner of flowcharts, Oxide & Neutrino references and the funniest Excel joke you will ever see in your life. One to definitely watch out for.